The ordinary things

Milne and Shepard are remembered at Ashdown Forest, where animals and children still play. Photo by David Brooker via Wikimedia Commons [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)]

Milne and Shepard are remembered at Ashdown Forest, where animals and children still play.
Photo by David Brooker via Wikimedia Commons [CC-BY-SA-2.0 ]

“If I seem to write to write most happily about the ordinary things that boys do who live in the country it is because this is the part of my childhood that I look back upon with the greatest affection.”Christopher Milne

Look closely at the name of the person who wrote today’s quote.  I’ll give you a hint: his middle name was Robin.  Yesterday I quoted from Winnie the Pooh. Today I quote from the boy who loved the original “Edward Bear,” and inspired the timeless stories.

Christopher Robin Milne was not pleased with the fame imposed on him by his father’s literary success.  In fact, he was persecuted by his classmates at boarding school, who would taunt him with verses about him they took from Milne’s writing.  The probability that these bullying classmates were teasing him out of jealousy or envy did not lessen the sting.

The magical moments in Ashdown Forest that his father preserved for future generations to enjoy as the “Hundred Acre Wood” were to be Christopher Robin’s happiest times.  There is a lesson and a gift for all of us in this truth.  You may never become famous as a character in a beloved semi-imaginary world, but rest assured: there are moments in your most normal days that literally are the stuff that dreams are made of.

What ordinary things will you encounter today, that will be looked back upon “with the greatest affection?”

One year ago today:

Enter this wild wood

Photo by Nigel Freeman [CC-BY-SA-2.0 ] via Wikimedia Commons

Photo by Nigel Freeman  via Wikimedia Commons [CC-BY-SA-2.0 ]

This post was first published seven years ago today. The original post, comments and photo are linked, along with two other related posts, below. These links to related posts, and their thumbnail photos, do not appear in the blog feed; they are only visible when viewing the individual posts by clicking on each one. I have no idea why, nor do I know how they choose the related posts. That’s just the way WordPress does things.

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